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My sister got me on a kick last year of buying the big bag of peeled garlic at Costco rather than buying it a head at a time. She spreads the entire bag on a large jelly roll pan and drizzles olive oil over all of it. Not a lot of oil but about 3 T. We turn on the oven to 350 and roast the garlic golden brown or until the house reeks of it and then set it aside to cool. The bonus is that the garlic is sweet, not bitter, and we put them into small ziploc bags and into the freezer. I did this once this year already and the flavor in everything is better! 

When looking through the New Ball Blue Book I was looking for something different that would be good for most everything we eat at home. I remember that I had all that garlic ready to go and spotted this recipe. It sounded perfect for chicken, pork, awesome on ham steak, and can't wait to try it on our camping trips with our bratwurst over the campfire. 

The recipe is really straight forward. I decided to not make it too hot for hubby and cut back on the peppers which is fine and will not affect the outcome of the shelf stability. I opened my apple juice and it had fermented but had a bottle of apple cider that worked in a pinch. I also substituted white vinegar for white wine vinegar since I have not found a wine vinegar other than red that was 5% acidity. These are all substitutions you can do as long as you don't add more than what is called for in the recipe. The result was a perfect spicy blend of garlic mustard that is smooth and creamy like a sauce. 

Garlic Mustard Sauce
Yield about 6-8 half pints

2 pounds garlic bulbs (25 roasted whole cloves)
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil (for roasting garlic only)
1 pound Granny smith apples (about 3)
2 cups apple juice, divided (I used apple cider)
1 pound Anaheim peppers (about 18-20.. Note: 1 pound was 4 large for me)
8 Serrano peppers (too hot for hubby used 3 red seeded)
1/4 cup mustard powder
2 T. yellow mustard seed
1 T. coriander seeds
1 1/2 cups white wine vinegar, 5% acidity (I used white vinegar)

Preparation : Prepare 6-8 half pint jars, lids, and rings. Sterilize the jars and keep them in the hot water till its time for processing. Make sure to fill your water bath canner and get the water to a simmer. Peel and core apples. Chop apples into 1/2 inch pieces. Cut tops off garlic to expose individual cloves.   

Cooking: In a stainless steel or enameled dutch pot combine apples and 1 cup of apple juice. Simmer apples and juice for 5 minutes; set aside. Place garlic bulbs in a baking dish. Pour olive oil over cut surface of garlic. Bake garlic at 350 degrees F until tender. Cool garlic. Separate cloves of garlic and peel.
Roast peppers under a broiler until skins wrinkle and char in spots, turning to roast evenly. Put roasted peppers in a paper or ziploc bag and secure closed. Cool 15 minutes. Remove stems and skins from peppers. 

Puree apple mixture, garlic, and peppers using either a food processor, immersion blender or food mill. Combine puree, 1 cup of apple juice, and remaining ingredients in a large saucepan. Bring mixture to a boil over medium-high heat; boil 10 minutes, stirring to prevent sticking. 

Filling the jars:  On a dishtowel place your hot jars and fill with the the mixture.  Using your funnel ladle into each of the jars leaving 1/2” headspace. Remove air bubbles and refill to the proper headspace if necessary. Taking a clean paper towel wet it with warm water and wipe the rims of the jars removing any food particles that would interfere with a good seal. Using your magic wand extract the lids from the hot water and place them on the now cleaned rims. Add your rings to the tops of each of the jars and turn to seal just "fingertight".

Processing: Make sure your rack is on the bottom of the canner and place the jars in the water bath making sure that the water covers each of the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add hot water to the canner if it doesn't measure up. Cover the pot and turn up the heat under the canner and wait for the water to start boiling. Once the water has come to a boil start your timer for 10 minutes. When complete turn off the heat and remove the cover and let the jars sit for another few minutes. Remove the jars and place them back on the dishtowel in a place that they will sit overnight to cool. Do not touch or move them till the next morning.

Sealing: Some time in the next hour your jars will be making a "pinging" or "popping" noise. That is the glass cooling and the reaction of the lids being sucked into the jar for proper sealing. Some recipes may take overnight to seal. Check your lids and reprocess any jars that did not seal.

Ball Blue Book


New Ball Blue Book 2015 pg 128. 

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